Curriculum

Bachelor of Technology (B. Tech) in Mechanical Engineering

The Mechanical Engineering curriculum is geared towards providing the student with a strong foundation in the discipline, an understanding of the component fields of fluid and thermal sciences, mechanics, materials, system dynamics and control, manufacturing and product design, the skills of analysis and design for engineering new products and processes, and the competencies that will enable them to innovate, to address new and challenging problems.  Our curriculum prepares the student for the workplace or further study by gaining mastery of the concepts through projects and assignments, experience in real-world applications and practices through industry internships, and exposure to ongoing research problems and the methodology of research and innovation through the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP). In order to earn a B. Tech. degree in Mechanical Engineering, a student should earn a minimum of 176 credits in the course of their study. The credit requirements for their program of study is comprised of 4 parts:

  • General Education Requirements – Humanities and Social Science (HS)
  • Science and Engineering Requirements – Basic Sciences (BS) and Engineering Science (ES)
  • Disciplinary Requirements comprising of:
    • Mechanical Engineering Core courses (ME)
    • Mechanical Engineering Electives (ME-E)
    • Research, Design, and Industry Practice component -- Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP), Summer Internships, Specialized courses through the Study Abroad program, Senior Thesis Project, and Industry CO-OP through the semester.
  • Open Electives (OE)

One credit corresponds to one hour of lecture, 2 hours of recitation or 2 hours of lab work. Typically, one credit translates to 3 hours of work per week for a student as a combination of in-class and out-of-class engagement with the course work. In-class work corresponds to time spent in lecture, recitation, and discussion sessions. Out-of-class student work includes homework assignments, project work, independent or group study, or other work relating to the course.

General Education Requirements (GER)

The General Education Requirements consist of courses in Humanities and Social Sciences that are aimed at developing communication skills, both oral and written; understanding human cultures, past and present; gaining awareness of concepts, ideas, and systems of thought that underlie human activities; understanding the social, political, and economic framework of societies; and understanding the impact of science and technology on society.  Courses pertaining to communication skills, law and ethics, and the relationship between science, technology and society are required of every student.

Science and Engineering Requirements (SER)

The Basic Sciences courses aim to provide the outgoing graduates with a strong foundation in the sciences. Required courses include courses is Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Environmental Science.  A strong foundation in Mathematics and Physics equips the student with the necessary analytical skills. The Engineering Sciences requirements support multiple objectives:  first, the courses provide a foundation in the basic tools and methodologies common to all engineering disciplines; second, all students are exposed to basics of each discipline allowing for cross-disciplinary competencies; last, there is a multi-disciplinary project component where students from different engineering disciplines come together on a design project, allowing for practice in collaborative team work.

Mechanical Engineering Degree Requirements

The disciplinary core courses are aimed at providing the student with a solid foundation in their chosen field of study. The disciplinary electives, on the other hand, provide the student with an option to gain exposure to different specializations within the discipline, or an opportunity to study one of the subfields in some depth.

Open Electives

The open subject elective courses provide the student wide latitude to pursue their interests, be it in humanities, arts, their chosen field of study, a related discipline, or use it towards developing a concentration in another field as a Minor.

Advanced Undergraduate Subjects, and courses from within and outside engineering disciplines for “minor” fields of study in addition to their major are being evolved in partnerships with international experts. The students can elect to consider these additional options upon joining the university.

  • Mechanical Engineering Major Requirements

    Credits
  • Humanities & Social Science (HS)

    18
  • Basic Sciences (BS)

    35
  • Engineering Sciences (ES)

    19
  • ME Core courses (ME)

    52
  • Project, Seminar, Senior Design, Co-op (RD)

    27
  • Department Electives (ME-E)

    16
  • Open subject Electives (OE)

    9
  • Degree requirement (HS+BS+ES+ME+ME-E+RD+OE)

    176
  • Semester 1

    Credits
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective - 1

    3
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective - 2

    3
  • BIO 101 - Introduction to Biology

    4

Prerequisites: High-school Biology

The course focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. The core material focuses on function at a molecular level:

  • the structure and regulation of genes, and the structure and synthesis of proteins
  • how these molecules are integrated into cells
  • how cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms
  • computational and genomic approaches to biology.
  • CHE 102 - Introduction to Solid-state Chemistry

    4

Prerequisites: High-school Chemistry

Covers the basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. Characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers (including proteins). Topical coverage of organic chemistry, solution chemistry, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, biochemistry, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and phase diagrams. Examples from industrial practice (including the environmental impact of chemical processes), from energy generation and storage (e.g., batteries and fuel cells), and from emerging technologies

  • ENG 121 / CSE 101 - Introduction to Computer Science and Programming

    5

Prerequisites: None

Introduction to computer science and programming for students with little or no programming experience. Students learn how to program and how to use computational techniques to solve problems. Topics include software design, algorithms, data analysis, and simulation techniques. Assignments are done using the Python programming language. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning.

  • ENG 101 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3

Prerequisites: None

Integrated approach to the fundamental scientific principles that underly engineering analysis: conservation of mass, atomic species, charge, momentum, angular momentum, energy, production of entropy expressed in the form of balance equations on carefully defined systems, and incorporating simple physical models. Emphasis is on setting up analysis problems arising in engineering. Topics: simple analytical solutions, numerical solutions of linear algebraic equations, and laboratory experiences. Provides the foundation and tools for subsequent engineering courses.

  • 22
  • Semester 2

    Credits
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective - 1

    3
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective - 2

    3
  • MAT 111 - Math I: Single-variable calculus

    4

Prerequisites: High-school Mathematics 

This calculus course covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, and concludes with a brief discussion of infinite series. Illustrate applications to many scientific disciplines including physics, engineering, and economics. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning.

  • PHY 111 - Physics I: Introduction to Classical Mechanics

    4

Prerequisites: High-school Physics

This first course in Physics is an introduction to classical mechanics. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which features small group interaction via table-top experiments utilizing laptops for data acquisition and problem solving workshops. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning

  • ENG 111/ EEE 101 - Basic Electronics

    4

Prerequisites: None

Overview of electronic circuits and applications. Electrical quantities and their measurement, including operation of the oscilloscope. Basic models of electronic components including resistors, capacitors, inductors, and the operational amplifier. Frequency response of linear circuits, including basic filters, using phasor analysis. Digital logic fundamentals, logic gates, and basic combinatorial logic blocks. Lab. Lab assignments.

  • ENG 105 - Engineering Graphics

    3

Prerequisites: None

The course provides the fundamentals of engineering drawing. Topics include: orthographic projection, dimensioning, sectioning, exploded and auxiliary views, assembly drawings, and CAD Design software. Homework drawings are of parts fabricated by the student in the lab.

  • ME 103 - Mechanical Engineering Tools

    1

Prerequisites: None

Introduces the fundamentals of machine tools use, computer tools use and fabrication techniques. Students work with a variety of machine tools including the bandsaw, milling machine, and lathe. Instruction given on MATLAB®, MAPLE®, XESS™, and CAD. Emphasis is on problem solving, not programming or algorithmic development. Assignments are project-oriented relating to mechanical engineering topics.

  • 22
  • Summer after Semester 2: Summer internship or UROP opportunity for students (Optional; students can earn up to 3 credits) **

  • Semester 3

    Credits
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective

    3
  • MAT 121 - Math II: Multi-variable calculus

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 111 (Single-variable Calculus)

This course covers vector and multi-variable calculus.. Topics include vectors and matrices, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, and vector calculus in 2 and 3-space. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning.

  • PHY 112 - Physics II: Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism

    4

Prerequisites: PHY 111(Classical Mechanics),MAT 111 (Single-variable Calculus)

This second coursein introductory physics focuses is on electricity and magnetism. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which utilizes small group interaction and current technology. The TEAL/Studio Project at MIT is a new approach to physics education designed to help students develop much better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning

  • ENV 101 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    3

Prerequisites: None

This course provides an integrated, quantitative and interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental systems. Topics include Environment, Structure and functions in an ecosystem; Biosphere, Broad nature of chemical composition of plants and animals; Natural Resources covering Renewable and Non-renewable Resources, Forests, water, minerals, Food and land ; Energy, Growing energy needs, energy sources; Biodiversity and its conservation; Environmental Pollution; Environmental Biotechnology; Social Issues and Environment covering, problems relating to urban living, climate change, environmental regulation, and environmental ethics.

  • ME 121 - Designing with 3D Technology

    3

Prerequisites: CSE 101 (Introduction to Computer Science and Programming), ME 103(Mechanical Engineering Tools)

A hands-on engineering design course that covers advanced 3D imaging and computational modeling skills in order to leverage the benefits of additive manufacturing to solve complex problems. Students will connect the theory behind these tools to direct experience with the equipment and software. Short assignments at the start of the semester will build students' core competencies and prepare them for a team-based, open-ended project.

  • ME 141 - Introduction to Thermodynamics

    3

Prerequisites: MAT 121(Multi-variable Calculus), PHY 111 (Introduction to Classical Mechanics)

The basic principles of thermodynamics are introduced in this course. Development of the first and second laws of thermodynamics with special consideration of the rate processes associated with heat transfer and work transfer. Entropy generation and its influence on the performance of engineering systems. Covers generation and utilization of energy in central power generation plants, solar systems, refrigeration devices, and automobile, jet and gas-turbine engines.

  • UROP

    3
  • 23
  • Semester 4

    Credits
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective

    3
  • MAT 131 - Differential Equations

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 121 (Multi-variable Calculus)

This course is a study of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE's), including modeling physical systems. Topics include: Solution of First-order ODE's by Analytical, Graphical and Numerical Methods; Linear ODE's, Especially Second Order with Constant Coefficients; Undetermined Coefficients and Variation of Parameters; Sinusoidal and Exponential Signals: Oscillations, Damping, Resonance; Complex Numbers and Exponentials; Fourier Series, Periodic Solutions; Delta Functions, Convolution, and Laplace Transform Methods; Matrix and First-order Linear Systems: Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors; and Non-linear Autonomous Systems: Critical Point Analysis and Phase Plane Diagrams.

  • MAT 151 - Linear Algebra

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 121 (Multi-variable Calculus)

This is a basic subject on matrix theory and linear algebra. Emphasis is given to topics that will be useful in other disciplines, including systems of equations, vector spaces, determinants, eigenvalues, similarity, and positive definite matrices.

  • ME 132 - Numerical Computation for Mechanical Engineers

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 121(Multi-variable Calculus), PHY 112(Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism)

Covers Numerical methods relevant to Mechanical Engineering, including approximation (interpolation, least squares, and statistical regression), integration, solution of linear and nonlinear equations, and ordinary differential equations. Presents deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Uses examples from Mechanical Engineering -- dynamics, and structural analysis. Assignments require programming.

  • ME 164 - Elements of Structure

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 121(Multi-variable Calculus), PHY 111 (Introduction to Classical Mechanics)

The course introduces principles of structural analysis and strength of materials in applications to three essential types of load-bearing elements: bars in axial loading, axisymmetric shafts in torsion, and symmetric beams in bending. The course covers fundamental concepts of continuum mechanics, including internal resultants, displacement fields, stress, and strain. While emphasizing analytical techniques, the course also provides an introduction to computing environments (MATLAB) and numerical methods (Finite Elements: Akselos). Students learn how to predict linear elastic behavior and prevent structural failure, by relying on the notions of equilibrium, geometric compatibility, and constitutive material response.

  • ME 151 - Introduction to Fluid Mechanics

    3

Prerequisites: ME 141 (thermodynamics)

Elements of fluid mechanics as applied to engineering problems. Equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow. Coupled and uncoupled fluid models. Hydrostatics. Control volume laws for mass, momentum, and energy. Inviscid flow analysis and Bernoulli equation. . Dimensional analysis and similarity. Internal and external laminar viscous flows. Flow in ducts. Boundary layer flows. Lift and drag.

  • 22
  • Summer term after year 2

    up to 6 credits
    Internship / UROP/Summer abroad (optional)
  • Semester 5

    Credits
  • ME 223 - Introduction to Heat Transfer

    3

Prerequisites: ME 141(Therodynamics), ME 151 (Fluid Mechanics), MAT 131 (Differential Equations)

The course covers principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation with examples from the engineering of practical devices and systems. Conduction heat transfer in solids including steady-state and transient situations. Conduction by extended surfaces, boundary layer theory for forced and natural convection, boiling, heat exchangers, and graybody radiative exchange.

  • ME 225 - Measurement and Instrumentation

    4

Prerequisites: PHY 112(Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism), ME 164 (Elements of Structure)
Corequisites: ME 172 (Dynmaics and Control)

Covers techniques for observation and measurement of physical variables such as force, strain, temperature, flow rate, and acceleration. Principles of transduction, measurement circuitry, MEMS sensors, Fourier transforms, linear and nonlinear function fitting, uncertainty analysis, probability density functions and statistics, system identification, electrical impedance analysis and transfer functions, computer-aided experimentation, and technical reporting.

  • ME 221 - Introduction to Design and Manufacturing

    4

Prerequisites: ME 164 (Elements of Structure), ME 132 (Numerical Computation), ME 103 (Mechanical Engineering Tools)

Focuses on design engineering skills. Employs active learning via a major design-and-build project. Lecture topics include idea generation, estimation, concept selection, visual thinking, computer-aided design (CAD), mechanism design, machine elements, basic electronics, technical communication, and ethics. How to complete projects on schedule and within budget. Emphasizes robust design and manufacturability.

  • ME 172 - Dynamics and Control I

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 131(Differential Equations) , PHY 111 (Introduction to Classical Mechanics)

Introduction to the dynamics and vibrations of lumped-parameter models of mechanical systems. Kinematics. Force-momentum formulation for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion. Work-energy concepts. Virtual displacements and virtual work. Lagrange's equations for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion. Linearization of equations of motion. Linear stability analysis of mechanical systems. Free and forced vibration of linear multi-degree of freedom models of mechanical systems; matrix eigenvalue problems. Application to mechanical, biomechanical, and aerospace systems.

  • ME-Elective

    4
  • Open Elective

    3
  • 22
  • Semester 6

    Credits
  • Co-Op / Capstone Project (May-July, 3.0 months)

    4
  • ME 251 - Fluid Mechanics II

    3

Prerequisites: ME 151 (Introduction to Fluid Mechanics)

Engineering applications involving compressible flow: aircraft and rocket propulsion, power generation; application of mass, momentum, energy and entropy balance to compressible flows; variable area isentropic flow, normal shock waves, adiabatic flow with friction, flow with heat addition. Operation of flow systems: the propulsion system. Turbomachinery: pumps, compressors, turbines. Angular momentum analysis of turbomachine performance, centrifugal and axial flow machines, effect of blade geometry, dimensionless performance of turbomachines; hydraulic turbines; steam turbines; wind turbines. Compressible flow turbomachinery: the aircraft engine.

  • ME 272 - Dynamics and Control II

    4

Prerequisites: PHY 112(Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism), ME 172 (Dynamics and Control)

Modeling, analysis, and control of dynamic systems. System modeling: lumped parameter models of mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical systems; interconnection laws; actuators and sensors. Linear systems theory: linear algebra; Laplace transform; transfer functions, time response and frequency response, poles and zeros; block diagrams; solutions via analytical and numerical techniques; stability. Introduction to feedback control: closed-loop response; PID compensation; steady-state characteristics, root-locus design concepts, frequency-domain design concepts. Laboratory experiments and control design projects.

  • ME-Elective

    4
  • ENG 321 - Multi-disciplinary Design Project

    4

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Semesters 1 to 5

Students from different engineering disciplines - EEE, ECE, ME and CSE - will come together on an engineering design project. Will engage in collaborative work and build a prototype.

  • Open Elective

    3
  • 22
  • Summer term after year 3 - Industry Internship / Co-op / Capstone Project - Up to 6 credits”

  • Semester 7

    Credits
  • ME 252 - Advanced Thermal Systems

    4

Prerequisites: ME 251 (Fluid Mechanics II), ME 223 (Heat Transfer)

Thermal analysis and engineering emphasizing integrating heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics into a unified approach to treating complex systems. Mixtures, humidity, chemical and phase equilibrium, and availability. Labs apply principles through hands-on experience

  • ME 264 - Mechanics of Materials

    4

Prerequisites: ME164 (Elements of Structure), CHE 102 (Solid-state Chemistry)

Covers the fundamentals of mechanical behavior of materials, as well as design with materials. Topics include: elasticity, plasticity, limit analysis, fatigue, fracture, and creep. Materials selection. Laboratory experiments involving projects related to materials in mechanical design.

  • ME 321 - Manufacturing and Design

    4

Prerequisites: ME 221(Introduction to Design and Manufacturing)

Integration of design, engineering, and management disciplines and practices for analysis and design of manufacturing enterprises. Overview of manufacturing processes crucial to the practice of design. Physics and stochastic nature of manufacturing processes and systems, and their effects on quality, rate, cost, and flexibility. Topics include process physics and control, design for manufacturing, and manufacturing systems. Group project requires design and fabrication of parts using mass-production and assembly methods to produce a product in quantity.

  • ME Elective

    4
  • ME Elective

    4
  • Open Elective

    3
  • 23
  • Semester 8 - Option 1

    Credits
  • Co-op

    20
  • Semester 8 - Option 2

    Credits
  • Senior Project

    20
  • Mechanical Engineering Course Electives

  • Aircraft and Rocket Propulsion
  • Introduction to Mechatronics
  • Fundamentals of Nanoengineering
  • Introduction to Robotics
  • Biomechanics
  • Introduction to Sensors
  • Design of Feedback Control Systems
  • Vehicle Dynamics and Control
  • Internal Combustion Engines
  • Engineering Management
  • Humanities Course Electives

  • Principles of Macroeconomics
  • Principles of Microeconomics
  • Behavioral Economics
  • Economic Theory and Public Policy
  • Economics and E-commerce
  • Data Analysis for Social Scientists
  • Game Theory
  • Professional Ethics **
  • Law for Engineers**
  • Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology
  • Science, Technology and Society **
  • Introduction to Linguistics
  • Psychology
  • Communication & Presentation Skills**
  • Written Communication skills **
  • Foreign Languages - French, German, Spanish, Mandarin,..
  • Historical Thinking
  • Political Science
  • Music
  • Theater

Note: Courses marked ** are required to be completed as part of degree requirement.

  • Science Course Electives

  • Introduction to Geology
  • Introduction to Planetary Science
  • Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience
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