Curriculum

Bachelor of Technology (B. Tech) in Electrical and Electronics Engineering

The Electrical and Electronics Engineering curriculum is geared towards providing the student with a strong foundation in the discipline, an exposure to and understanding of the wide-ranging applications of this field, the skills of analysis and design for engineering new systems, and the competencies that will enable them to think out of the box and innovate, to address new and challenging problems. In order to earn a B. Tech. degree in Electrical and Electronics Engineering, a student should earn a minimum of 175 credits in the course of their study. The credit requirements for their program of study is comprised of 4 parts:

  • General Education Requirements – Humanities and Social Science (HS)
  • Science and Engineering Requirements – Basic Sciences (BS) and Engineering Science (ES)
  • Disciplinary Requirements comprising of:
    • Electrical and Electronics Engineering Core courses (EEE)
    • Electrical and Electronics Engineering Electives (EEE-E)
    • Research, Design, and Industry Practice component -- Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP), Summer Internships, Specialized courses through the Study Abroad program, Senior Thesis Project, and Industry CO-OP through the semester.
  • Open Electives (OE)

One credit corresponds to one hour of lecture, 2 hours of recitation or 2 hours of lab work. Typically, one credit translates to 3 hours of work per week for a student as a combination of in-class and out-of-class engagement with the course work. In-class work corresponds to time spent in lecture, recitation, and discussion sessions. Out-of-class student work includes homework assignments, project work, independent or group study, or other work relating to the course.

General Education Requirements (GER)

The General Education Requirements consist of courses in Humanities and Social Sciences that are aimed at developing communication skills, both oral and written; understanding human cultures, past and present; gaining awareness of concepts, ideas, and systems of thought that underlie human activities; understanding the social, political, and economic framework of societies; and understanding the impact of science and technology on society.  Courses pertaining to communication skills, law and ethics, and the relationship between science, technology and society are required of every student.

Science and Engineering Requirements (SER)

The Basic Sciences courses aim to provide the outgoing graduates with a strong foundation in the sciences. Required courses include courses is Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Environmental Science.  A strong foundation in Mathematics and Physics equips the student with the necessary analytical skills. The Engineering Sciences requirements support multiple objectives:  first, the courses provide a foundation in the basic tools and methodologies common to all engineering disciplines; second, all students are exposed to basics of each discipline allowing for cross-disciplinary competencies; last, there is a multi-disciplinary project component where students from different engineering disciplines come together on a design project, allowing for practice in collaborative team work.

Electrical and Electronics Engineering Requirements

The disciplinary core courses are aimed at providing the student with a solid foundation in their chosen field of study. The disciplinary electives, on the other hand, provide the student with an option to gain exposure to different specializations within the discipline, or an opportunity to study one of the subfields in some depth.

Open Electives

The open subject elective courses provide the student wide latitude to pursue their interests, be it in humanities, arts, their chosen field of study, a related discipline, or use it towards developing a concentration in another field as a Minor.

Advanced Undergraduate Subjects, and courses from within and outside engineering disciplines for “minor” fields of study in addition to their major are being evolved in partnerships with international experts. The students can elect to consider these additional options upon joining the university.

  • Electrical and Electronics Engineering Major Requirements

    Credits
  • Humanities & Social Science (HS)

    18
  • Basic Sciences (BS)

    35
  • Engineering Sciences (ES)

    20
  • EEE Core courses (EEE)

    51
  • Project, Seminar, Senior Design, Co-op (RD)

    27
  • Department Electives (EEE-E)

    15
  • Open subject Electives (OE)

    9
  • Degree requirement (HS+BS+ES+EEE+EEE-E+RD+OE)

    175
  • Semester 1

    Credits
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective - 1

    3
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective - 2

    3
  • BIO 101 - Introduction to Biology

    4

Prerequisites: High-school Biology

The course focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. The core material focuses on function at a molecular level:

  • the structure and regulation of genes, and the structure and synthesis of proteins
  • how these molecules are integrated into cells
  • how cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms
  • computational and genomic approaches to biology.
  • CHE 101 - Principles of Chemistry

    4

Prerequisites: High-school Chemistry

This course provides an introduction to the chemistry of biological, inorganic, and organic molecules. The emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis.

  • ENG 121 / CSE 101 - Introduction to Computer Science and Programming

    5

Prerequisites: None

Introduction to computer science and programming for students with little or no programming experience. Students learn how to program and how to use computational techniques to solve problems. Topics include software design, algorithms, data analysis, and simulation techniques. Assignments are done using the Python programming language. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning.

  • ENG 101 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3

Prerequisites: None

Integrated approach to the fundamental scientific principles that underly engineering analysis: conservation of mass, atomic species, charge, momentum, angular momentum, energy, production of entropy expressed in the form of balance equations on carefully defined systems, and incorporating simple physical models. Emphasis is on setting up analysis problems arising in engineering. Topics: simple analytical solutions, numerical solutions of linear algebraic equations, and laboratory experiences. Provides the foundation and tools for subsequent engineering courses.

  • 22
  • Semester 2

    Credits
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective - 1

    3
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective - 2

    3
  • MAT 111 - Math I: Single-variable Calculus

    4

Prerequisites: High-school Mathematics

This calculus course covers differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, and concludes with a brief discussion of infinite series. Illustrate applications to many scientific disciplines including physics, engineering, and economics. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning.

  • PHY 111 - Physics I: Introduction to Classical Mechanics

    4

Prerequisites: High-school Physics

This first course in Physics is an introduction to classical mechanics. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which features small group interaction via table-top experiments utilizing laptops for data acquisition and problem solving workshops. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning.

  • ENG 111/ EEE 101 - Basic Electronics

    4

Prerequisites: None

Overview of electronic circuits and applications. Electrical quantities and their measurement, including operation of the oscilloscope. Basic models of electronic components including resistors, capacitors, inductors, and the operational amplifier. Frequency response of linear circuits, including basic filters, using phasor analysis. Digital logic fundamentals, logic gates, and basic combinatorial logic blocks. Lab. Lab assignments.

  • EEE 102 / CSE 103 - Introduction to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    4

Prerequisites: CSE 101 (Introduction to Computer Science and Programming)

An integrated introduction to electrical engineering and computer science, taught using substantial laboratory experiments. Key issues in the design of engineered artifacts operating in the natural world: measuring and modeling system behaviors; assessing errors in sensors and effectors; specifying tasks; designing solutions based on analytical and computational models; planning, executing, and evaluating experimental tests of performance; refining models and designs. Issues addressed in the context of computer programs, control systems, probabilistic inference problems, circuits and transducers, which all play important roles in achieving robust operation of a large variety of engineered systems.

  • 22
  • Summer after Semester 2: Summer internship or UROP opportunity for students (Optional; students can earn up to 3 credits)

  • Semester 3

    Credits
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective

    3
  • MAT 121 - Math II: Multi-variable Calculus

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 111 (Single-variable Calculus)

This course covers vector and multi-variable calculus.. Topics include vectors and matrices, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, and vector calculus in 2 and 3-space. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning.

  • PHY 112 - Physics II: introduction to Electricity & Magnetism

    4

Prerequisites: PHY 111(Classical Mechanics),MAT 111 (Single-variable Calculus)

This second course in introductory physics focuses is on electricity and magnetism. The subject is taught using the TEAL (Technology Enabled Active Learning) format which utilizes small group interaction and current technology. The TEAL/Studio Project at MIT is a new approach to physics education designed to help students develop much better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena. This course is a MITx offering licensed through MIT's Office of Digital Learning.

  • ENV 101 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    3

Prerequisites: None

This course provides an integrated, quantitative and interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental systems. Topics include Environment, Structure and functions in an ecosystem; Biosphere, Broad nature of chemical composition of plants and animals; Natural Resources covering Renewable and Non-renewable Resources, Forests, water, minerals, Food and land ; Energy, Growing energy needs, energy sources; Biodiversity and its conservation; Environmental Pollution; Environmental Biotechnology; Social Issues and Environment covering, problems relating to urban living, climate change, environmental regulation, and environmental ethics.

  • ENG 132 / MAT 161 - Probability and Statistics for Engineers

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 121 (Multi-variable Calculus)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; limit theorems; Bayesian estimation; modeling and analysis of probabilistic systems;Elements of statistical inference. Bernoulli and Poisson processes. Markov chains; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields.

  • ECE 102 / CSE 105 - Introduction to Communication Networks

    4

Prerequisites: CSE 101 (Introduction to Computer Science and Programming)

Studies key concepts, systems, and algorithms to reliably communicate data in settings ranging from the cellular phone network and the Internet to deep space. Weekly laboratory experiments explore these areas in depth. Topics presented in three modules - bits, signals, and packets - spanning the multiple layers of a communication system. Bits module includes information, entropy, data compression algorithms, and error correction with block and convolutional codes. Signals module includes modeling physical channels and noise, signal design, filtering and detection, modulation, and frequency-division multiplexing. Packets module includes switching and queuing principles, media access control, routing protocols, and data transport protocols.

  • UROP** (Summer after semester 2- Optional)

    3
  • 22
  • Semester 4

    Credits
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Elective

    3
  • MAT 151 - Linear Algebra

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 121 (Multi-variable Calculus)

This is a basic subject on matrix theory and linear algebra. Emphasis is given to topics that will be useful in other disciplines, including systems of equations, vector spaces, determinants, eigenvalues, similarity, and positive definite matrices.

  • MAT 131 - Differential Equations

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 121 (Multi-variable Calculus)

This course is a study of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE's), including modeling physical systems. Topics include: Solution of First-order ODE's by Analytical, Graphical and Numerical Methods; Linear ODE's, Especially Second Order with Constant Coefficients; Undetermined Coefficients and Variation of Parameters; Sinusoidal and Exponential Signals: Oscillations, Damping, Resonance; Complex Numbers and Exponentials; Fourier Series, Periodic Solutions; Delta Functions, Convolution, and Laplace Transform Methods; Matrix and First-order Linear Systems: Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors; and Non-linear Autonomous Systems: Critical Point Analysis and Phase Plane Diagrams.

  • EEE 105/ECE 105 - Circuits and Electronics

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 121(Multi-variable Calculus), PHY 112(Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism)

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Resistive elements and networks, independent and dependent sources, switches and MOS devices, digital abstraction, amplifiers, and energy storage elements. Dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; analog and digital circuits and applications. Design exercises. Occasional laboratory.

  • EEE 107 - Electromagnetic Energy

    4

Prerequisites: PHY 112(Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism)

This course discusses applications of electromagnetic and equivalent quantum mechanical principles to classical and modern devices. Topics cover energy conversion and power flow in electrical and electromechanical systems, including electric motors and generators, electric circuit elements, quantum tunneling structures and instruments. Studies photons as waves and particles and their interaction with matter in optoelectronic devices, including solar cells and displays.

  • UROP

    3
  • 22
  • Summer term after year 2

    up to 6 credits
    Internship / UROP/Summer abroad (optional)
  • Semester 5

    Credits
  • EEE 121 / ECE 121 - Signal Processing and Linear Systems

    4

Prerequisites: MAT 131 (Differential Equation), PHY 112 (Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism)

Fundamentals of continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications drawn from engineering and physics, including audio and image processing, communications, and automatic control. Topics include: Fourier series and transforms, Laplace and Z transforms, and analysis of linear, time-invariant systems. Filtering and signal distortion. Time/frequency sampling and interpolation. Continuous-discrete-time signal conversion and quantization.

  • EEE 122/CSE 221 - Computation Structures

    4

Prerequisites: PHY 112 ((Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism)

Introduces architecture of digital systems, emphasizing structural principles common to a wide range of technologies. Multilevel implementation strategies; definition of new primitives (e.g., gates, instructions, procedures, and processes) and their mechanization using lower-level elements. Analysis of potential concurrency; precedence constraints and performance measures; pipelined and multidimensional systems. Instruction set design issues; architectural support for contemporary software structures.

  • EEE 142 / ECE 141 - Digital Systems Design

    4

Prerequisites: EEE 105 (circuits and Electronics)

The design of integrated digital systems encompassing both customized software and hardware. Sequential logic design and timing analysis. Clocks and synchronization. Finite state machines. Microcode control. Digital system design. Control and datapath partitioning. Software/hardware design tradeoffs. Algorithm design for pipelining and parallelism. System latency and throughput tradeoffs. FPGA optimization techniques. Integration with external systems and smart devices.

  • EEE 152 / ECE 132 - Microelectronic Devices and Circuits

    4

Prerequisites: EEE 105 (circuits and Electronics)

Microelectronic device modeling, and basic microelectronic circuit analysis and design. Physical electronics of semiconductor junction and MOS devices. Relating terminal behavior to internal physical processes, developing circuit models, and understanding the uses and limitations of different models. Use of incremental and large-signal techniques to analyze and design transistor circuits, with examples chosen from digital circuits, linear amplifiers, and other integrated circuits. Design project.

  • EEE Elective

    4
  • Open Elective

    3
  • 23
  • Semester 6

    Credits
  • Co-Op / Capstone Project (May-July, 3.0 months)

    4
  • EEE 221 - Feedback Control Design

    4

Prerequisites: EEE 121 (Signal processing and Linear Systems)

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops. Students apply the control concepts in weekly labs and class project.

  • EEE 231 / ECE 161- Embedded Systems

    4

Prerequisites: EEE 105 (circuits and Electronics), EEE 121 (Signal Processing and Linear Systems)

Introduces analysis and design of embedded systems. Emphasizes construction of complete systems, including a five-axis robot arm, a fluorescent lamp ballast, a tomographic imaging station (e.g., a CAT scan), and a simple calculator. Presents a range of basic tools, including software and development tools, programmable system on chip, peripheral components such as A/D converters, communication schemes, signal processing techniques, closed-loop digital feedback control, interface and power electronics, and modeling of electromechanical systems. Includes a sequence of assigned projects, followed by a final project.

  • EEE Elective

    3
  • Multi-disciplinary Design Project

    4

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Semesters 1 to 5

Students from different engineering disciplines - EEE, ECE, ME and CSE - will come together on an engineering design project. Will engage in collaborative work and build a prototype.

  • Open Elective

    3
  • 22
  • Summer term after year 3 - Industry Internship / Co-op / Capstone Project - Up to 6 credits

  • Semester 7

    Credits
  • EEE 241 - Introduction to Electric Power Systems

    3

Prerequisites: EEE 105 (circuits and Electronics), EEE 107 (Electromagnetic Energy)

Electric circuit theory with application to power handling electric circuits. Modeling and behavior of electromechanical devices, including magnetic circuits, motors, and generators. Operational fundamentals of synchronous, induction and DC machinery. Interconnection of generators and motors with electric power transmission and distribution circuits. Power generation, including alternative and sustainable sources. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

  • EEE 281 / ECE 281 - Digital Signal Processing

    4

Prerequisites: EEE 121 (Signal Processing and Linear Systems)

This is a course on digital signal processing techniques and their applications. Topics include: review of DSP fundamentals; discrete-time random signals; sampling and multi-rate systems; oversampling and quantization in A-to-D conversion; ; properties of LTI systems; quantization in fixed-point implementations of filters; digital filter design; discrete Fourier Transform and FFT; spectrum analysis using the DFT; and parametric signal modeling; applications of DSP in areas such as speech and audio processing, autonomous vehicles, and software radio. The lab component covers practical real-time applications of DSP.

  • ECE 251 - Computer Architecture

    4

Prerequisites: EEE 122 (Computation Structures)

Introduction to the principles underlying modern computer architecture. Emphasizes the relationship among technology, hardware organization, and programming systems in the evolution of computer architecture. Topics include: instruction set design; processor micro-architecture and pipelining; cache and virtual memory organizations; exception handling, protection and sharing; I/O and interrupts; in-order and out-of-order superscalar architectures; VLIW machines; vector supercomputers; multithreaded architectures; symmetric multiprocessors; and parallel computers.

  • EEE Elective

    4
  • EEE Elective

    4
  • Open Elective

    3
  • 22
  • Semester 8 - Option 1

    Credits
  • Co-op

    20
  • Semester 8 - Option 2

    Credits
  • Senior Project

    20
  • Electrical and Electronics Engineering Course Electives

  • Introduction to Robotics
  • Fundamentals of Photonics
  • Introduction to Biomedical Electronics
  • Digital Image Processing
  • Mechatronics
  • Introduction to VLSI Systems
  • Design of Algorithms
  • Introduction to Machine Learning
  • Virtual and Augmented Reality
  • Dynamic Systems and Control
  • Humanities Course Electives

  • Principles of Macroeconomics
  • Principles of Microeconomics
  • Behavioral Economics
  • Economic Theory and Public Policy
  • Economics and E-commerce
  • Data Analysis for Social Scientists
  • Game Theory
  • Professional Ethics **
  • Law for Engineers**
  • Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology
  • Science, Technology and Society **
  • Introduction to Linguistics
  • Psychology
  • Communication & Presentation Skills**
  • Written Communication skills **
  • Foreign Languages - French, German, Spanish, Mandarin,..
  • Historical Thinking
  • Political Science
  • Music
  • Theater

Note: Courses marked ** are required to be completed as part of degree requirement.

  • Science Course Electives

  • Introduction to Geology
  • Introduction to Planetary Science
  • Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience
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